Archive | 9:36 pm

Drawing Unknown Faces, part 56

17 Apr

This was a drawing that seemed easy enough, but wasn’t. The girl is photographed from above, so her whole face is foreshortened. I didn’t get it right, and settled for a non-optimal result. It is a nice drawing, but not what I wanted.

Drawing Unknown Faces, part 56

Even so, because I drew for 60 minutes, it has become a much better sketch than what I have produced so far today. I also notice that when I start to tell myself a story about my subject, I get much more involved and emotionally invested into continuing and trying to do better. I guess that’s because I need to have a purpose for drawing (like I need a purpose for shopping; I can’t shop for shopping’s sake).

The sketch is made in 60 minutes with an HB pencil. It is based on a photo I found on Flickr.com.

That is all.

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Drawing Unknown Faces, part 55

17 Apr

This was another experiment, namely to draw the initial shape in as less lines as possible. It is a method of getting the big shapes on paper first, put in some details and refine from there. These two babies seem to be the perfect subjects for that.

Drawing Unknown Faces, part 55

The baby on the left was drawn first, which is clear from the fact it doesn’t really resemble a baby. The baby on the right was drawn with more care, because I already had the first baby as a reference.

The sketch is based on a photo I grabbed from the public photo stream of Flickr, and was made with an HB pencil.

That is all.

Drawing Unknown Faces, part 54

17 Apr

To revigorate my drawing, I began reading “Sketchbook for the Artist” by Sarah Simblet. She explains that a drawing is an expression of how you see the world, rather than a technically correct representation of the world. Once you get lost in the technicalities of drawing, your art loses life and gets boring and predictable. I guess that was has crept in my artwork lately.

So, re-energized with this knowledge, I started to look at this photo and decided to depict the curious nature of this toddler. His extended hand gave me this expression.

Drawing Unknown Faces, part 54

Now, there was some extreme perspective in the photo, demonstrated by the fact that part of the body was out of focus. This means the photographer was quite close to his or her subject. However, I overdid it a bit, and drew the toddler’s head too small in proportion to the extended hand.

Was this wrong? No. In fact, it strengthened my notion that the hand was the most important part of this drawing. I need to learn to let go of the assumed requirement that my drawing should have a striking resemblance with the reference photo. That wouldn’t be art, but merely copying reality. There are much better tools for that, called cameras. I think I shouldn’t bother myself with that part of visualization, at least not while I’m drawing.

This sketch was made in 30 minutes with an HB pencil. It is based on a photo I grabbed from the Flickr public photo stream.

That is all.

Drawing Unknown Faces, part 53

17 Apr

After have drawn this unknown face from the Flickr public photo stream, it is starting to dawn upon me what I’m doing wrong, and why drawing from life is so much better than drawing from photographs.

Drawing Unknown Faces, part 53

I’m not treating the face as a three dimensional object, but rather as a flat surface. This means there is no unity in my drawings, at least, not one that is intentional. Perhaps I should be more modest and start using help lines, build the drawing as a whole, instead of a collection of features (eyes, ears, nose and mouth).

It would be like treating the drawing more as a building, rather than a collection of stones.

Only three weeks ago, I would have jumped a hole in the air if I could only draw like this. Now I’m already seeing that there are more holes in my drawing method than in a piece of Swiss cheese.

The sketch is based on a photo in the Flickr public photo stream, and is drawn with a 0.5 mm 2B technical pencil in 25 minutes.

That is all.

Drawing Unknown Faces, part 52

17 Apr

While this sketch looks fine on the surface, I’m getting the impression I’m doing something completely wrong. There is something missing in here, which prevents me from progressing to the next level.

Drawing Unknown Faces, part 52

I can quite put my finger on it, so I’ll keep making sketches like this until I can.

This sketch is based on a photo in the Flickr public photo stream. It is made with a 0.5 mm 2B technical pencil in roughly 20 minutes.

That is all.

Snake Plissken

17 Apr

I decided to give Snake Plissken my sketching treatment, expecting to need 30 minutes or so to complete. Well, it turned out to be much harder than that.

Snake Plissken

Kurt Russell has created the character Snake Plissken as an actor. However, what I didn’t realize from his tiny picture I grabbed from the Internet, is that his make-up is equally important.

It seems the manly smears all over his body are just for effect, but, in effect, those are all part of his personality. They all lead up to his one mean eye, that pricks you like a dagger. I guess Snake’s look can actually kill you.

He gaze is so powerful, I couldn’t get he face right. I got totally distracted by his coolness. I guess that is part of his persona, but for me it was not fun. I hate you, Snake Plissken (which he would have liked, I’m sure).

I had to keep correcting his face, to make it look more like the picture. I didn’t succeed, but I came as close as my current skills will allow me. For his shirt I used graphite power from the sharpening of the pencil. I hadn’t done this before, nor ever heard or read about this technique. But then, Snake Plissken is all about being unconventional.

The sketch took me 50 intense minutes with a wood-encased pencil to complete.

That is all.