Sarah Jessica Parker

14 Apr

My guess was (and still is) that I keep making the same mistakes over and over again, and that those mistakes are preventing me from getting better at drawing (well there’s some progress). I want to escape “amateur hour” and get more serious about my craft.

I picked a photo from my TV guide of Sarah Jessica Parker and decided to stick to it as close as possible, using rather crude tools (4H pencil and Pentel Color Brush pen) for rendering a full body at such a small size (less than 20 cm high).

Sarah Jessica Parker

While the end result might not surprise you if you have followed me lately, how I came to this result is what interested me and might interest you too. So I recorded the full 20 minutes drawing session with my iPod Touch on a stand (mic stand with a clamp to hold the mic).

In the inking stage my voice becomes very soft, as I’m trying to see the whole picture. I’m sure I’m using both halves of my brain at that stage, preventing me to talk in a normal conversational voice. I’m sorry for that. I guess once my process is more established, I’ll be able to give more attention to talking to you guys and gals.

Some observations. Drawing what you see, isn’t literally drawing what you see, but rather observing, reasoning, forming an idea in your mind, and executing that idea. Since that idea can be wrong, it’s important to stay loose in the initial stages. As you can see in the video, I went into detail far too early, and made some wrong assumptions.

Furthermore, since inking is permanent, it’s important to form some kind of plan in your mind’s eye, and use the sketch to formalize that plan, containing little reminders and hints of what you were thinking. It’s about how to put something on paper, where and with what line quality. I think sketching should be an important part of the inking, and be used to annotate your though process. It isn’t a rendering, but rather a visual guide for the inking. A sketch is not a drawing, not a finished piece of art.

I need to change my attitude to sketching and treat it like the intermediate step it really is. Less is often better, because it’s less confusing for the inker (which is the same person here, but doesn’t have to be).

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