Tag Archives: reference photo

Drawing a dog skeleton, part 2

3 Oct

So after a night’s sleep I tried two more sketches of a dog skeleton, based on an illustration of J.C. Amberlyn. I think each version was better than the previous, and I get a better feel for how the bones interconnect into a skeleton and why they are shaped as they are. The sketches are still very off-model, though.

Dog skeleton, part 2
Dog skeleton, part 3

To avoid focusing too much on a single illustration, I looked for online photo references. By watching the video podcast Tekzilla Daily Tip 454 I came across a new Google Labs feature called Google Similar Images. It is similar to Google Images search, which the difference that you can look for images that are visually very similar.

Of course, I can’t share those images here (most are fully copyrighted), but I can share the artist’s impression of those images. For me it’s just another way to improve my drawing skills.

I hope this search tip will help you as well.

That is all.

Imagined versus referenced

25 Sep

I decided to compare how I did pure from imagination versus from a photograph on the computer screen. The subject was laughter. Why? Because this week’s episode of the Art & Story podcast gave me the gift of laughter. I finally understand why Jerzy laughs so much on the show. If you start making stories in your head and come across absurd situations, you can’t help but laugh out loud. I have never laughed so much on one day. Thanks, Jerzy and Mark for pointing me in the right direction towards telling your own comics stories.

More caricature prep, part 11 (version 11)More caricature prep, part 11 (version 12)

Both drawings need a bit of exaggeration, a bit of that absurdity that made me laugh out loud several times. I guess it is the statement caricaturists like to put in their artwork, not to make fun of someone in a harmful way, but to entertain people, make them loose themselves for a brief moment in a situation that is completely outside what we perceive as reality and would classify as preposterous and laughable, but still conforms to logic and reasoning. Humor is a very serious business and requires a lot of thinking on the part of the creator. It has to make sense, but be impossible at the same time. It is this contradiction which gives humor life.

That is all.